Corporate Communication for Pomegranate Books

Corporate Communication.  The term sounds easy enough to understand, right? So, what is it exactly?  We compiled the following working definition:  “Corporate communication is the Building and maintaining of a corporation’s brand and reputation by consistently and persuasively communicating its narrative and identity through the integration of symbols.”  (It’s not perfect, but it’s someplace for us to start.)

You may be thinking to yourself, “Great, this blog has provided us with yet another definition of corporate communication.”  Rather than beating a dead horse with a definition stick, we decided to focus more on the importance of the individual components of corporate communication and how they all work together to build and maintain a corporation’s brand and reputation.

Corporate communication isn’t just a stand-alone subject.  It is composed of many facets: the brand, its reputation, its identity, its narrative, and how symbols play into the creation and maintenance of all of these.  To help gain a better understanding of corporate communication in the real world, we decided to look to a company here in Wilmington that displays many of the aspects of corporate communication.  The company we chose is a local, independent bookstore known as Pomegranate Books.

We analyzed the methods that Pomegranate Books uses to build its brand and create relationships with its customers.  Let’s first look at the brand Pomegranate has created for itself as an independent bookstore that accommodates local writers and literary groups.  Their identity is rooted in the fact that they are smaller than the chain bookstores, while boasting to be the largest independent bookstore in Wilmington.   Their size allows them to better communicate with and cater to their local clientele.  They do this through good old-fashioned word of mouth, as well as social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and blogs.  On their facebook page, they consistently ask their followers what they are reading at the moment. This promotes a dialogue with their customers, which helps reinforce their narrative.  By combining social media, word of mouth, and press releases, they keep their reputation and identity consistent.

Pomegranate Book’s reputation is that of a “small, but well-curated” bookstore that caters to the community.  They communicate their reputation through their products and practices. Their narrative is based on their heavy involvement in the community.  The shop’s friendly staff supports businesses, charities, book clubs and events such as featuring local authors and holding book signings.  This helps to reinforce their local identity and reputation.

Pomegranate Books uses the logo of none other than a pomegranate to symbolize their company.  Much like the fruit of its namesake, Pomegranate Books has many seeds at its center. Through Pomegranate Book’s corporate communication, these seeds can sprout into helpful contributions to the community and create a positive environment.  Our group feels that this quaint little bookstore offers a true example of corporate communication at work.

-Sean, Eliza, Jocelyn, Sarah

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Corporate Communication for Pomegranate Books

  1. Greetings Corporate Commers from Milwaukee! I am a former blogger from Dr. Persuit’s AdvIMC class last spring, no longer in Wilmington, but at Marquette University pursuing my MA in Communication. With my ties back to the blog, it only feels right to comment.
    I have been reading along all week, learning your definitions of Corporate Comm and what exactly the phrase means. Funny story, today I met with a faculty member at MU to discuss my research interests for the next 2 years. I am an advocate for IMC, and part of my interest lie within the field. I tried my best to give my definition of IMC to this faculty member who is unfamiliar with the new-age idea. She laughed a bit and then explained that IMC is what I circled to say, and it is also what she thinks and what others think too. What she was trying to explain to me was that there is no concrete definition to communication or the sub-disciplines. Moreover, all communication including corporate communication is what those (educated) defining it means. We, the definers, are shaping the definition as we learn more about the world in which we live (be it a book store, AT&T or a credit card company) and re-defining it when necessary (a crisis occurring or re-branding the company’s identity).
    Although I haven’t taken a Corporate Comm class yet, I think the subject is very interesting and directly relates to my research. Just remember as you go through this course and the text you read, your definition will be molded and presented in new lights as the direction of the course changes. I would be interested to know your personal definitions at the end of the course to see if and how your initial definitions change.
    Best of luck and have fun!

  2. I enjoyed reading this blog because I can directly relate to small locally owned businesses because that is my roots. Coming from a small town in the hamptons on the eastern end of long island where they dont allow chain businesses I have had the oppurtunity to get a glimpse of corporate communication. Although they are small businesses like pomegrante books, they all represent something, and strive to tell their story in order to succeed. If they do not promote their business continually they will no longer exist. We see this often with the fall of the economy. Small businesses are constantly going under because they are not changing with the times. It is of utmost importance to get your story out there and be eager to change with the new technologies put before us.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s